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Outrageous Confessions of Lady Deborah

by

Book reviewed by Lori Carroll

After enduring years of a horrible marriage, Deborah picked up her quill to find a way to escape her existence. Writing about a woman that lived life to the fullest and gave no mercy to those in her path gave her strength. When her husband died unexpectedly, she saw no reason that her writings couldn't be used to now give her life meaning. No one knows that she is the authoress of the stories currently sweeping the ton.

Elliot has returned from war to find himself disgusted with the general lack of compassion given to those who fought for England. He knows he needed to do something about it, but the only skill he has is how to ferret out information and retrieve goods, usually referred to as stealing. When Deborah catches him escaping one night he figures he is done for. Instead she asks him to take her with him.

Elliot has never met a woman like Deborah before. And although she seems to share his passions, she refuses to let their relationship go any farther. He is determined to marry her and show her all ways he can pleasure her, but first he has to figure out what her husband did to her that has made her so skittish.

Usually, the hero is the one with all the secrets and emotional walls that the heroine must figure out how to break through. In this case, after Deborah catches Elliot stealing, he is an open book. It was a refreshing change to watch the hero work to find out why Deborah has become so reluctant to open her heart and body to a man.

Ms. Kaye did a very sneaky job of weaving a little political education throughout the story. Elliot returns home with what is known as "survivor's guilt" and all he sees is the lack of compassion from the government and society for the wounded soldiers that returned home. He is on a mission to help them get back some of what they've lost. Having Deborah turn her writing passion to the cause helped Elliot take his cause to another level. Elliot and Deborah's fight is obviously one we still experience today and in her own way, I feel Ms. Kaye is attempting to do her part by weaving the reality of wars throughout history into her story.

Instead of having Elliot magically wipe away all of Deborah's self-esteem issues, she had them spending months of time together in the writing of the book, which gave Deborah time to get to know Elliot and learn to trust him. It was refreshing to have an author give the characters the time that they needed to both grow emotionally.

If you're in the mood for just a simple love story with no suspenseful plot driving the story, this is perfect for you. Just two people learning to love one another through all their insecurities and emotional trauma.

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“He can break in to houses, but can he break into her heart?”

August 2012, 288 pages
Publisher: Harlequin
ISBN: 0373297009

Back Cover Blurb:

I am the Dowager Countess of Kinsail, and I have enough secrets to scandalize you for life. I will never reveal the truth of my soul-destroying marriage—some things are too dark to be told. But at least no one can guess that I, a famously icy-hearted widow, am also the authoress of the shamelessly voluptuous romances currently shocking the ton!

Only now I have a new secret identity, one that I will risk my life to keep—accomplice to Elliot Marchmont, gentleman, ex-soldier and notorious London thief. This adventurer's expert touch ignites in me a passion so intoxicating that surviving our blistering affair unscathed will be near impossible…

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